Reposted with permission from the Hobbs News Sun.

Owners are scouting spots for new type of restaurant

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CURTIS WYNNE/NEWS-SUN Public notice posted on building at 502 W. Navajo Dr. in Hobbs where Lovington-based Drylands Brewing Co. owners hopes to open a taproom serving beer, wine and cider within two months.

Just a little more than two years after opening its doors in Lovington, Drylands Brewery Co. is expanding with a taproom in Hobbs.

A state liquor license notice was posted on the front of the building at 502 W. Navajo Drive on Wednesday, giving the public 30 days to file an objection.

“The only thing we’re going to do is open a taproom and the only thing we’ll be serving is beer, wine and cider,” said co-owner Andres Arreola. “We’re not ready to serve food, yet.”

With an impressive menu, featuring pizza, the Lovington location of Drylands serves lunches and dinners on a restaurant side and drinks in a taproom.

Arreola and his partner Daniel Torres anticipate further growth in Hobbs after the taproom opens.

“We are building a new restaurant in the future, but it won’t be a Drylands,” Arreola said. “We don’t want to take away from the Lovington location, so we’re not going to replicate the food or the atmosphere. We’ll do something in Hobbs in the near future with food, just not at (the Navajo Drive location).”

He said they already are looking at a Hobbs property on which to build a new restaurant. Torres is a contractor who built the Drylands facility, the first major construction project in downtown Loving-ton in more than 30 years.

With a large patio area already behind the Navajo Drive building in Hobbs, Arreola said he hopes food trucks with various options of fare will park in front of the facility where customers can pick up their food, then come in for their drinks.

When will the taproom open for business?

“I’m thinking, maybe, in the next 60 days, hopefully anyway. I’m hoping,” Arreola said. “Maybe when we open this place, we’ll be working on the second location in Hobbs.”

Asked how many employees he expected to have at the Hobbs taproom, Arreola guessed just three or four, possibly coming from the Lovington location to help out.

“It’s a lot easier to manage,” he said, noting both the lack of a restaurant facility and no brewing to be done in Hobbs. The company boasted 30 full time and part time employees at the Lovington location.

The Hobbs location has previously been a nursery, an organic food market and a yoga studio.